What Is a Blowout?

Everyone likes to look and feel their best, and a blowout for your hair may be one of the best ways to accomplish that goal.

You probably have plenty of questions about this service, such as what the experience will be like, how long it will take and how much it will cost you. You can find all of the answers to those questions and many others in this easy style guide.

Table of Contents

What Is a Blowout?

A blowout is a unique way to style your hair using only heat and air to create smooth, shiny tresses with plenty of volume. The experience also includes a full shampoo and conditioning experience along with application of the perfect products designed to bring out the best in your hair.

Most blowouts are achieved in several steps for the best look. To begin, your stylist will get your hair ready with a shampoo designed to boost the health of your hair followed by a conditioner for hydrating and improving your hair’s shine.

Then, your hair is towel-dried. Your stylist will apply a detangling product or heat-protective spray such as one from Pureology or Amika depending on the current health of your hair.

Next, it is time to blow dry your hair using a quality round ceramic brush (like this one), which holds heat from the dryer and transfers it to your hair. These products and brushes help eliminate frizz while creating an incredibly smooth look.

Finally, the stylist will use cool air and a variety of products to set your desired style.

Brazilian Blowout

The Brazilian blowout is a type of smoothing treatment that creates even more intense shine thanks to the keratin-containing products (such as this) applied to your hair before drying.

This is an excellent option for people with all types of hair textures, and it can even work well on fine strands that are normally dragged down by conditioning products.

After this type of blowout, you may find that your hair is easier to manage than it ever has been in the past. This benefit comes from the keratin that completely coats every hair strand, protecting it from environmental elements that would otherwise cause it damage.

How Much Does a Blowout Cost?

how much does a blowout cost?

Of course, a blowout service can vary widely in cost based on the salon you choose. Going to an Ulta Salon or a local high end salon is obviously going to cost more than a blowout at somewhere like Fantastic Sams. is  any add-ons you request and the texture and length of your hair.

Most blowouts will only set you back $45 or less. However, some high-end services can cost up to $90.

A Brazilian blowout will cost even more, but you will certainly be gaining when it comes to months of manageability. Most of these blowouts cost at least $200 with the average price coming in at approximately $400.

How Long Does a Blowout Take?

If you only take 5 to 10 minutes to blow dry your hair at home, you may be expecting something similar during a professional blowout. However, you should budget more time than this for your appointment because most blowouts take approximately 45 minutes from start to finish.

If you are opting for a Brazilian hair smoothing treatment, you should budget even more time because many appointments take from an hour to an hour and a half to complete based on your hair texture.

How Long Does a Blowout Last?

For a typical blowout, your straight, smooth tresses should last anywhere from three to five days. In fact, the longer you get regular blowouts, the longer you may be able to wait between appointments as your hair and scalp will get used to your treatments.

Also, keep in mind that you may need to come in more regularly if you have very fine or oily hair. On the other hand, the keratin treatment from your Brazilian blowout can last from three to four months as long as you care for your hair well in the meantime.

Related: How to Keep Hair Straight Overnight

Can You Blowout Hair at Home?

can you blowout hair at home?

After watching your stylist tame your hair several times, you may think that you can save some money by doing this yourself at home.

However, keep in mind that you will be losing out on the relaxation portion of the service as well as on the consultation services. In addition, you may have trouble getting the perfect look because you cannot see the back of your head perfectly.

If you do want to try a home blowout or are looking for a way to care for your tresses between appointments, invest in a hair dryer with a tapered nozzle for directing hot air and a cool button for setting your strands.

The BaBylissPRO line is a great option. Their Nano Titanium Dryer is a huge step up from cheap hair dryers and comparable to ones costing 3-4x more.

In addition, you will want a round ceramic brush. Choose a wider brush if you have longer hair. You should also pre-dry your hair until it is approximately 50% dry before drying your hair in sections. Be sure to use heat-protective products to increase shine.

See Also: Pros and Cons of Curly vs Straight Hair

Is a Blowout Bad for Your Hair?

While a blowout does require heat to be used on your hair, you should know that the blow dryer will never get as hot as a curling or straightening iron does.

Therefore, while any heat can eventually cause some damage to strands of hair over time, regular blowouts can actually reduce damage when compared to the daily use of a different heat styling product.

If you are looking for a great way to take your hairstyle to the next level or want a delightful pampering experience before your next girl’s weekend, be sure to consider a professional blowout.

Taken From: https://www.salonrates.com/what-is-a-blowout/

MASSAGE FOR WINTER SPORTS

MASSAGE FOR WINTER SPORTS – Unfortunately, the vast majority of people who participate in many outdoor winter sports do not properly prepare themselves ahead of time for the stress these activities can place on their bodies. Furthermore, most do not live close enough to an area where they can engage in these activities on a regular basis.

At best, they end up hitting it hard on the weekends or, more likely, packing as much activity as possible into sporadic stints of a week here or long weekend there. As a result, a combination of a lack of proper preparation and intermittent yet intense periods of activity can frequently lead to post-exercise soreness, strained and pulled muscles—or worse.

A sports massage therapist can do a few things to help this type of client. there are four different types of sports massage: general massage, pre-event massage, post-event recovery massage and injury massage. For most individuals involved in winter sports, massage can be consolidated into two categories: general pre-activity massage and post-activity recovery massage.

For both types of sports massage, it is useful to go through a series of range-of-motion tests before the session to look for areas that may be tight and restricting normal movement, and again after the massage to examine how the treatment has impacted these restrictions.

General Pre-Activity Massage
General pre-activity massage should focus on loosening up the muscles that are primarily engaged during that sport and preparing the body to perform the best it possibly can. The work should combine slow, controlled strokes with compressions and kneading. The pressure should be deep enough to be effective, yet not so deep that your client’s body fights you by resisting and tensing up. It is also beneficial to incorporate some assisted dynamic stretching, such as Active Isolated Stretching, into part of your session.

Post-Activity Recovery Massage
Post-activity recovery massage should be geared toward helping the body recover more quickly from an activity, while at the same time addressing any muscle strains or pulls. It should combine flushing strokes using moderate pressure with trigger-point therapy and movement techniques, such as pin-and-stretch or Active Release Technique. Static stretches of 30 to 45 seconds can also be incorporated after massaging a muscle or region. A cold whirlpool or ice bath for 10 minutes is a great way to top off the end of the session.

Regardless of which type of massage you are giving, it is important to understand the muscles that experience the most stress for each of the more popular winter sports. Outlined below are five recreational winter activities and the primary muscles that are engaged during those activities.

Downhill Skiing
The entire way down the mountain, downhill, or alpine, skier is essentially maintaining a quarter-squat position. The rectus femoris, vastus intermedius and gluteus maximus bear the brunt of the workload, as they are in a constant state of contraction. A large part of the massage should focus on these two regions.

Other muscles that are stressed in the lower body during downhill skiing include the peroneus longus, biceps femoris, adductor longus and gluteus medius. Although the upper body is usually not heavily involved, it may also be worthwhile to check certain muscles around the shoulders including the rhomboids, trapezius, latissimus dorsi, pecs and deltoids as well as the erectors down the spine.

Snowboarding
Snowboarders stress their bodies a bit differently than downhill skiers do. The core plays a key role in moving a snowboarder down a slope. As a result, the low back has to do a significant amount of work.

You should start by working the quadratus lumborum, multifidi, external obliques and psoai. The gastocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior of the lower legs should also be massaged, as they are fundamental to the heel-toe motion that occurs when snowboarding. The hamstrings and quadriceps muscles should also be checked.

Beginners who fall a number of times also stress their wrists and shoulders. Snowboarders who end up spending a lot of time on the ground usually require work on the forearm flexors and extensors as well as supraspinatus and subscapularis.

“MASSAGE FOR WINTER SPORTS”
About the Author
Mark Fadil is the co-founder of Sports Medicine Institute, a performance center which focuses on sports and orthopedic massage, in Palo Alto, California. He is also the founder of PHLX, a comprehensive foam roller system that empowers the user to recreate hands-on techniques utilized by skilled massage therapists. He wrote “Sports Massage for Runners” and “Massage for Golfers: Keep Your Clients on the Course” for MASSAGE Magazine.

HIKING IN NATURE CHANGES YOUR BRAIN

HIKING IN NATURE CHANGES YOUR BRAIN – Immersing yourself in the great outdoors can ease stress and heighten your mood, but a new study shows it can even help you stop ruminating— or overthinking and dwelling on situations and life events. Rumination is linked to mental illness, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as binge-drinking and binge-eating.

The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found spending time in nature can lower negative, obsessive thoughts by a sizeable margin. The researchers aimed to find out the impact of nature on the mind. They compared the thoughts of urban dwellers who walked through an urban environment for 90 minutes with those who walked through a natural environment. Those who walked in nature reported fewer negative thoughts. They also had less neural activity in the part of the brain associated with mental illness, known as the subgenual prefrontal cortex.

Hiking Enhances Creativity and Problem-Solving

Disconnecting from technology and reconnecting with nature can increase creativity and problem-solving, according to a study conducted by psychologists Ruth Ann Atchley and David L. Strayer. Participants went on a four-day tech-free backpacking excursion and were asked to perform creative-thinking and complex problem-solving tasks. The researchers found their performance on these tasks improved by 50% after hiking through nature.

The researchers noted that technology and urban noise are constantly demanding our attention and inhibiting our focus, which strains our cognitive functions. Going on a peaceful nature hike, while cutting ties with technology, can be just what you need to recharge.

Hiking May Lessen ADHD Symptoms in Children

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHA) is becoming increasingly common among children. Those with ADHD exhibit hyperactivity, inattention, and difficulty focusing.  It often arises in childhood, with symptoms continuing into adulthood. While medication is typically prescribed to ADHA patients, a study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, found exposure to green outdoor activities like hiking can drastically reduce their symptoms. This suggests anyone with difficulty concentrating or controlling their impulses can benefit from spending time in nature.

Hiking is a fun and healthy activity suitable for all ages and fitness levels. So, strap on your hiking boots and go exploring!

“HOW HIKING IN NATURE CHANGES YOUR BRAIN”

by: Nicole Romeo

From: http://blog.spaweek.com/2016/08/30/hiking-changes-your-brain/

Massage measurably reduces stress

A study finds that 10 minutes of massage or relaxation can activate the body’s system for overcoming stress.

Massage measurably reduces stress – The damaging effects of stress are well-known, but fortunately, our bodies have a built-in system for managing and recovering from it. This system is called the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS).

While there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that taking time to relax — especially when it involves massage — can activate the PSNS, the new study by psychologists at the University of Konstanz in Germany has scientifically measured and confirmed this effect.

In their paper, the researchers conclude that short periods of relaxation may be psychologically and physiologically regenerative and that the effect is even more pronounced with a massage.

The senior author of the study is Prof. Jens Pruessner of the university’s Neuropsychology lab, who is a member of the Cluster of Excellence “Centre for the Advanced Study of Collective Behaviour.” He explains the importance of the new research:

“To get a better handle on the negative effects of stress, we need to understand its opposite — relaxation. Relaxation therapies show great promise as a holistic way to treat stress, but the more systematic scientific appraisal of these methods is needed.”

The study appears in the September 2020 issue of Scientific Reports.

The study

For their study, the team divided the participants into three groups.

The first group received 10-minute head-and-neck massages with a moderate pressure intended to stimulate the PSNS’s vagus nerve. This nerve contains some 75% of the PSNS nerve fibers, branching out to the many organs in the body with which the system interacts.

The second group of individuals received much softer 10-minute neck-and-shoulder massages as a means of determining the PSNS-activating effect of simple tactile contact.

A third control group simply sat at a table relaxing for 10 minutes.

The researchers used both physiological and psychological measurements to evaluate the degree to which each intervention, or lack of, had activated the participants’ PSNS.

Neuropsychology doctoral student Maria Meier led the team, who assessed the tests’ physiological effect by measuring the participants’ heart rate, as well as their heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is a measurement of variations in the time intervals between heartbeats.

For example, when the body is in fight-or-flight mode, there is a very little variation because the heart beats quickly at a steady rate. This will provide a low HRV value. When the body is relaxed, a greater degree of variation occurs, resulting in a higher HRV.

All of the participants had significantly higher HRV levels afterward. However, the most dramatic increases in HRV belonged to those who had received massages. The type of massage did not matter.

Simple tactile contact proved just as effective for helping an individual relax as a massage designed specifically to activate the PSNS.

Psychologically, all participants reported feeling less stressed and more relaxed after the tests.

Overall, the experiments confirmed that simply taking a few moments to relax can help a person manage stress. Adding a relaxing massage does, even more, to activate the PSNS and alleviate the physical and mental effects of stress.

Stress management

Meier concludes: “We are very encouraged by the findings that short periods of disengagement are enough to relax not just the mind but also the body. You don’t need professional treatment in order to relax. Having somebody gently stroke your shoulders, or even just resting your head on the table for 10 minutes, is an effective way to boost your body’s physiological engine of relaxation.”

Equally important as the study’s finding is the development of a system for objectively evaluating relaxation therapies. With experts often citing stress as the driver of diseases such as depression, a reliable means of validating relaxation techniques clearly has value.

Says Meier, “Massage, being such a commonly used relaxation therapy, was our first study. Our next step is to test if other short interventions, like breathing exercises and meditation, show similar psychological and physiological relaxation results.”’

From: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/massage-measurably-reduces-stress