Breckenridge massage therapy

What is deep tissue massage?

What is deep-tissue massage?

Deep tissue massage is a massage technique that’s mainly used to treat musculoskeletal issues, such as strains and sports injuries. It involves applying sustained pressure using slow, deep strokes to target the inner layers of your muscles and connective tissues. This helps to break up scar tissue that forms following an injury and reduce tension in muscle and tissue.

It may also promote faster healing by increasing blood flow and reducing inflammation.

Read on to learn more about deep tissue massage, including how it stacks up against Swedish massage and what to expect during a session.

What are the benefits of deep tissue massage?

Deep tissue massage offers both physical and psychological benefits. Unlike other massage techniques that focus on relaxation, deep tissue massage helps to treat muscle pain and improve stiffness. But it can still help to you unwind mentally, too.

A 2014 study involving 59 participants found that deep tissue massage helped to reduce pain in people with chronic low back. The authors likened its effects to those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil).

People have also reported that deep tissue massage helps with:

How does it compare to Swedish massage?

Deep tissue massage and Swedish massage are two different types of massage therapy. Both use some of the same strokes, but they have different uses and vary greatly when it comes to the amount of pressure used.

Here are the key differences between deep tissue massage and Swedish massage:

  • Intended use. Deep tissue massage is primarily used to treat chronic pain and muscle and sports-related injuries. Swedish massage is mainly used to promote relaxation and reduce muscle tension caused by everyday activities, such as sitting at a computer.
  • Pressure. Swedish massage is a gentler form of massage that uses far less tension than deep tissue massage. Both types involve use of the palms and fingers to knead and manipulate your tissues, but the elbows and forearms may also be used to apply increased pressure during a deep tissue massage.
  • Area of focus. Deep tissue massage targets the inner layers of your muscles. It’s used to treat muscle and tendon injuries, pain, and stiffness in your major muscle groups and joints. Swedish massage targets the superficial layers of muscle and focuses on the parts of your body that tend to hold the most tension, such as your neck, shoulders, and back.

What happens during the massage?

Before your deep tissue massage, your massage therapist will want to know about your problem areas. A deep tissue massage can involve your entire body or just one area.

Once ready, you’ll be asked to lie on your back or stomach, under a sheet. Your level of undress is based on your comfort, but the area being worked on will need to be exposed.

The massage therapist will warm up your muscles using a lighter touch. Once you’re warmed up, they’ll start working on your problem areas. They’ll use deep kneading and stroking with varying amounts of intense pressure.

Are there any side effects?

It’s not unusual to have some lingering soreness for a few days following a deep tissue massage. Using a heating pad or a cold pack wrapped in a towel may help to relieve soreness.

Though massage therapy is generally safe, deep tissue massage uses very firm pressure and may not be safe for everyone.

Speak to your doctor before having a deep tissue massage if you:

  • have a history of blood clots or a clotting disorder
  • are taking blood thinners
  • have a bleeding disorder
  • have cancer or are undergoing cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy or radiation

Anyone with osteoporosis or cancer that’s spread to the bones should avoid deep tissue massage as the firm pressure used may cause a fracture. You should also hold off on deep tissue massages if you’re pregnant. Gentler types of massage, such as Swedish massage, maybe a better option.

If you have an open wound or skin infection of any kind, you’ll need to reschedule to avoid developing new infection or making an existing one worse.

How do I find a therapist?

If you want to try a deep tissue massage, it’s important to work with a qualified massage therapist.

To find a massage therapist:

  • ask your doctor or physical therapist for a referral
  • ask friends and family for a recommendation
  • search the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork’s database
  • use the America Massage Therapy Association’s database

As you sort through potential massage therapists, keep a few things in mind:

  • Area of focus. Not all massage therapists specialize in deep tissue massage. Some are trained in several types while others focus their practice on one or two. Be sure to ask if they offer deep tissue massage and what conditions they have experience treating.
  • Cost. Ask about the cost per session and whether they offer cost-saving incentives, such as a sliding-scale option. You might also want to check with your health insurance provider, as some cover massage therapy, especially for specific conditions.
  • Credentials. Ask for credentials and make sure that the therapist is licensed to practice massage therapy in your area. In the United States, most states regulate the massage therapy profession.

The bottom line

Deep tissue massage is best suited for people who engage in highly physical activities, such as running or those who have an injury or chronic pain. If you have a low pain threshold or are looking for relief of tense muscles, Swedish massage is gentler and may be a better option. Speak to your doctor before trying deep tissue massage if you have an underlying medical condition.

Massage Therapy for Skiers

Whether you are a local with a season pass, or in town for a winter vacation, after the first few days hitting the slopes the inevitable soreness and achiness in the muscles and body begin to set in. Skiing, no matter your skill level, is an extreme sport. Hard falls, high speeds, and rough terrain all combine to make skiing and snowboarding a highly intense winter activity. Skiing engages your full body and all of its muscle groups, and while it’s a great workout, there’s a lot of opportunity for injury as well.

Much of the injury that may occur from skiing is due to wear and tear on the body. Most injuries will be bruises, as well as sore and pulled muscles. The joints are usually in the most danger of being injured more seriously. According to the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA) knee injuries alone account for about 45% of all serious skiing injuries, with hips being the next for the highest chance of injury. Moguls, sharp inclines, and turns can wreak havoc on the joints of a skier over time.

The best way to avoid injury during the ski season is through preventative measures. Along with having properly fitted gear (and of course, always a helmet), it’s important your body and mind are prepared as well. Keeping up with a healthy, athletic lifestyle in the offseason will ensure your body is ready for ski season. Be sure to get some good stretching in before and after a day on the slopes. In addition to keeping your body in shape, keeping a relaxed and focused mind will also benefit your performance on the slopes. In the event of injury, acting quickly is key. Being sure to rest, ice injuries, keep injuries elevated, and seek professional medical help when needed will help protect against further damage and injury.

Massage Therapy for Skiers

In addition to leading an active healthy lifestyle, purchasing the best equipment, and taking care of an injury in a timely manner, all skiers beginner to professional should consider adding massage therapy to their arsenal of injury prevention and treatment methods. Massage therapy both before and after skiing will help ensure you shred the slopes, not your body.

Massage therapy plays a vital role in sports medicine. Massage therapy benefits the body by helping to increase blood flow, oxygenate the muscles, and improve lymphatic drainage, and aid in the removal of toxins from the body. Massage therapy can greatly assist full-body recovery as well as strengthening the muscles for future physical activity.

Using massage as a preventative measure before skiing can help reduce your risk of injury this ski season. Getting a massage before hitting the mountain will release tension in the body, relax and elongate the muscles and improve flexibility, taking stress off the joints. A relaxing massage will also help promote a clear, relaxed mind, keeping you focused and aware of your surroundings during your runs.

Scheduling an après ski massage will help aid your body’s recovery process and prevent future injury. Working out muscles kinks, improving circulation, and draining toxins will reduce inflammation, shorten muscle recovery time, and ease soreness. A post-ski massage will help you unwind after a long day skiing, and promote deeper relaxation and better sleep so you’ll be ready to go again the following day.

“Massage Therapy for Skiers”
Resouce Post: https://kneadinghandstherapy.com/benefits-of-massage-therapy-for-skiers/

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“KENRA PROFESSIONAL PROUDLY PETA CERTIFIED” – Kenra Professional is proud to be PETA certified! You may have seen the term “PETA certified” on other cruelty-free brands in the market, but what does this actually mean?

This certification by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) indicates that we do not conduct or commission any animal testing for our ingredients, formulations, or finished products and that we at Kenra Professional, pledge not to ever do so in the future.
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